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                                                 CPS - USPS 70 Years  

 

2008, marks the 70th anniversary of Canadian Power & Sail Squadrons.
The following is a summary of the beginnings of CPS as taken from the
50th anniversary insert found in the 1988 edition Port Hole

Canadian Power Squadrons was born fifty years ago in the City of Windsor, ON. not in a blaze of glory,
 but in a rather quiet, unobtrusive way, without a name, funds, or yet members.
 
It all began in 1938, when three members of the Windsor Yacht Club, having heard about the
United States Power Squadrons, crossed the Ambassador Bridge into the motor city of Detroit, Michigan.
 Under the direction of the Detroit Power Squadron, which supplied both instruction and material, these
three enthused boaters took, and passed the USPS Junior Piloting Course.
 
They were Fred Dane, George Ruel, and G. William Bowman. These three men formed the basis of our organization as it is today. Later, along with other boaters, they formed the first Squadron in Canada, know as Windsor Power Squadron,  with G.W Bowman as its first Commander of Canadian Power Squadrons.
 
Word spread fast, and two other groups were quietly formed, one in Sarnia, the other in London. In 1941,
these three groups met in Chatham, ON. and formed Canadian Power Squadrons, setting up a suitable
Constitution and By-laws.
 
 A certificate of membership was issued as follows: “_______________ has passed the prescribed
entrance examination in Coastal Navigation and the Pilot Rules of the Great Lakes,
 and has been admitted to membership, etc., etc.”
 
Note that the tuition was basically confined to the Great Lakes.
 Little information is available describing the Squadron activities between the years 1938 to 1946.
The organization went into semi-hibernation, chiefly due to the lack of fuel, and the fact that many boaters were involved in World War II operations.
 
In spite of this period of inactivity, a nucleus of members, under Chief Commander Harry McGladdery, worked diligently to secure a Dominion Charter.
They also designed our flag and submitted it to the Federal Government for registration.